Find us on Google+ Rick and JoAnne's RV Travels: Shiloh National Military Park and Cemetery...revisited!

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Shiloh National Military Park and Cemetery...revisited!

JoAnne Morgan
We have been "on the go" these past few weeks so I wanted to catch up while we have some decent Internet access, on what we've been up to.

On March 25th...Yes, this is another one of those places we had visited before and didn't remember until we pulled into the visitors parking lot. Only this time, we stayed longer, studied more areas and monuments, and truly explored the park, plus the surrounding areas. We were there on the anniversary of the actual battle on April 6th and 7th, 1862 which gave us a whole new perspective, and discovered the Shiloh Missippian-era Indian Mounds which is now a National Historic Landmark.

We also had the opportunity to actually go into the Shiloh Visitor's Center this time which had a great film detailing Shiloh (also known as the "Battle of Pittsburg Landing"), the Civil War's first major combat in the western theater.
We visited the town of Savannah, TN. We saw Cherry Manson, which served as General Ulysses S. Grant's headquarters during the Battle of Shiloh, and on the way out of town, we had the chance to stop at the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center in Corinth, MS near the site of Battery Robinett, a Union fortification around which some of the bloodiest fighting during the Battle of Corinth took place.

Even though one would think you might have an uneasy feeling of bloodshed and war, the day we were there left us with a feeling of peace and calm. The day was beautiful, flowers were blooming, the sun was shining, and there was a calm, cooling breeze along the Mississippi River.

If you ever get the chance to stop at the Tennessee River Museum while in Savannah, TN, make sure to do it! It was a great museum that chronicled prehistoric times, life of the Missippian mound builders, and told the tragic story of the "Trail of Tears," and the Civil War on the River, the Golden Age of Steamboats, and the Tennessee River today. SEE PHOTOS HERE